Shoulder injection steroids

Q. My arm became limp after flu shot & have had pain in arm. Vaccine itself or improper injection? Any advice? I could not move my arm about 3 hours after the injection. It took about 3 days before I could raise my arm at all. It became painful to use and has bothered me for a couple of months. The doctor gave me a cortisone shot which helped some but not completely. He had never seen this reaction before. Is it a reaction to the vaccine or could it be the way it was injected? Is their anyone who has had or knows of a similar case? A. I had a flu shot last October, and it was given to me directly on the backside (and up high) of my shoulder. I went to the gym after I received the shot, and now have two tears in my (torn) rotator cuff, with a perforation in my rotator cuff tendon. I think it may have been improperly given. Now I need to have surgery to repair it. Look up your symptoms on webmd, and surf the net. Talk to your doctor too. The only way to find out what is really going on with it is to have an MRI. A simple xray will not reveal a tear in the muscle or tendon in the rotator cuff. If you can't lift your arm, and have trouble sleeping at night, and pain on your deltoid and bicep (rotator cuff injury pain radiates to these areas) because of the pain, then chances are you have an injured rotator cuff. These people giving these immunizations need more training. They are causing serious injury to people that go in to get a shot to stay healthy, and then end up with a serious injury, and possible surgery !!! Goo

Tendonitis, more properly termed tendinosis, results from acute or chronic stress of the rotator cuff tendons. Rotator cuff impingement results from repeated irritation of the rotator cuff beneath the acromial arch. 20 Repetitive overhead reaching and weight training are frequent precipitants of rotator cuff tendinosis and impingement. Rotator cuff tendinosis is diagnosed by eliciting pain or weakness with stress testing of the rotator cuff muscles. There are two common tests used for diagnosis of impingement. The Hawkins' test elicits pain with the shoulder passively flexed to 90 degrees and internally rotated. 21 The Neer's test elicits pain with passive abduction of the shoulder to 180 degrees. 22 Radiographs, if obtained, may show calcific deposits in the subacromial space or at the insertion of the supraspinatus tendon to the greater tuberosity. In cases of impingement, curvature of the acromion process may be seen.

I had an MRI in May. The images showed excessive fluid buildup and inflammation in the bursa, and a small incomplete tear in my rotator cuff. The tear is in line with the fibers of my cuff, much like a split in a seam. It’s unclear whether I had the tear before the shot or whether the shot caused it. I’d had no prior symptoms, and Annunziata says the shot might either have caused the tear – if the needle went into the cuff – or stirred up a prolonged inflammatory response in the area, causing the tear to become painful.

Shoulder injection steroids

shoulder injection steroids

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