Bell's palsy steroid dose

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      Bell's palsy has a high rate of spontaneous recovery (1)

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  • Citation tools Download this article to citation manager Piercy Jo . Bell's palsy BMJ 2005; 330 :1374
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    We identified seven trials, with 895 evaluable participants for this review . All provided data suitable for the primary outcome meta-analysis . One of the trials was new since the last version of this Cochrane systematic review . Risk of bias in the older, smaller studies included some unclear- or high- risk assessments, whereas we deemed the larger studies at low risk of bias . Overall, 79/452 (17%) participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation ; significantly fewer than the 125/447 (28%) in the control group ( risk ratio ( RR ) , 95% confidence interval ( CI ) to , seven trials, n = 895). The number of people who need to be treated with corticosteroids to avoid one incomplete recovery was 10 (95% CI 6 to 20). The reduction in the proportion of participants with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation was very similar in the corticosteroid and placebo groups ( RR , 95% CI to , two trials, n = 75, low-quality evidence). However, there was a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in participants receiving corticosteroids ( RR , 95% CI to , three trials, n = 485, moderate-quality evidence). Three studies explicitly recorded the absence of adverse effects attributable to corticosteroids. One trial reported that three participants receiving prednisolone had temporary sleep disturbances and two trials gave a detailed account of adverse effects occurring in 93 participants, all non-serious; the combined analysis of data from these three trials found no significant difference in adverse effect rates between people receiving corticosteroids and people receiving placebo ( RR , 95% CI to , n = 715).

    Bell's palsy steroid dose

    bell's palsy steroid dose

    We identified seven trials, with 895 evaluable participants for this review . All provided data suitable for the primary outcome meta-analysis . One of the trials was new since the last version of this Cochrane systematic review . Risk of bias in the older, smaller studies included some unclear- or high- risk assessments, whereas we deemed the larger studies at low risk of bias . Overall, 79/452 (17%) participants allocated to corticosteroids had incomplete recovery of facial motor function six months or more after randomisation ; significantly fewer than the 125/447 (28%) in the control group ( risk ratio ( RR ) , 95% confidence interval ( CI ) to , seven trials, n = 895). The number of people who need to be treated with corticosteroids to avoid one incomplete recovery was 10 (95% CI 6 to 20). The reduction in the proportion of participants with cosmetically disabling sequelae six months after randomisation was very similar in the corticosteroid and placebo groups ( RR , 95% CI to , two trials, n = 75, low-quality evidence). However, there was a significant reduction in motor synkinesis during follow-up in participants receiving corticosteroids ( RR , 95% CI to , three trials, n = 485, moderate-quality evidence). Three studies explicitly recorded the absence of adverse effects attributable to corticosteroids. One trial reported that three participants receiving prednisolone had temporary sleep disturbances and two trials gave a detailed account of adverse effects occurring in 93 participants, all non-serious; the combined analysis of data from these three trials found no significant difference in adverse effect rates between people receiving corticosteroids and people receiving placebo ( RR , 95% CI to , n = 715).

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