Baby born 33 weeks steroid shots


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At 33 weeks pregnant, your baby weighs over 4 pounds and may be as long as inches! As your pregnancy week by week continues, your baby is spiraling toward his birth weight and length! By the time you give birth, your little one may be as heavy as 7 to 8 pounds and over 20 inches long.

Your baby's brain is busy maturing and increasing in size. Parts of the brain are starting to function, including the auditory cortex (the area of the brain that's responsible for making sense of sounds), visual cortex (the region of the brain that processes visual information), and Broca's area (the part of the brain that's involved in speech and language processing).

Your little bundle of joy's fingernails might reach the tip of his or her fingers. Fortunately, there is no danger of your child accidentally scratching his or her precious face – his or her nails are very soft, as a result of their constant immersion in amniotic fluid.

Your baby's bones continue to harden with the help of the calcium from your diet. (If you don't have sufficient calcium in your diet, your baby will rob this nutrient from the reservoir in your bones.

At this point in your pregnancy, your baby is swallowing almost a liter of amniotic fluid every day. Amniotic fluid provides your baby with proteins and nutrients, and it also aids in helping his gut development.

Your baby's nose is almost fully formed. The bridge has formed and your baby no longer has that "button nose" appearance. Your baby's face is rounding out, and your little one may actually be a bit chubby from here on out.

By 33 weeks pregnant, your baby is often making faces in the womb. He or she may be smiling, sticking out his or her tongue, and making the goofiest expressions.

The fact that premature babies are not fully developed has now been ascertained. Another vital system for human health, the immune system, is also underdeveloped at this time, leading to a greater risk of an infection. Due to the fact that premature babies often require medical and/or surgical exposure, there are numerous avenues in which an infection can assault the baby, be it via the feeding tube, a surgical incision, et cetera, as well as the fact that they will likely have to spend an extended amount of time in the hospital, where sick people reside.

For an added sense of security, many healthcare providers recommend that after 28 weeks, you formally monitor your baby's movements at least once or twice a day. There are lots of different ways to do these "kick counts," so check with your doctor or midwife about how she wants you to track your baby's movements. Here's one common approach: Choose a time of day when your baby tends to be active. (Ideally, you'll want to do the counts at roughly the same time each day.) Sit quietly or lie on your side so you won't get distracted. Time how long it takes for you to feel 10 distinct movements – kicks, twitches, and whole body movements all count. You should feel at least 10 movements within two hours. (Don't worry; it probably won't take that long. Sometimes you'll feel 10 kicks within the first 10 minutes.) If you don't feel 10 movements in two hours, stop counting and call your healthcare provider.

Baby born 33 weeks steroid shots

baby born 33 weeks steroid shots

For an added sense of security, many healthcare providers recommend that after 28 weeks, you formally monitor your baby's movements at least once or twice a day. There are lots of different ways to do these "kick counts," so check with your doctor or midwife about how she wants you to track your baby's movements. Here's one common approach: Choose a time of day when your baby tends to be active. (Ideally, you'll want to do the counts at roughly the same time each day.) Sit quietly or lie on your side so you won't get distracted. Time how long it takes for you to feel 10 distinct movements – kicks, twitches, and whole body movements all count. You should feel at least 10 movements within two hours. (Don't worry; it probably won't take that long. Sometimes you'll feel 10 kicks within the first 10 minutes.) If you don't feel 10 movements in two hours, stop counting and call your healthcare provider.

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