Allergic rhinitis steroid spray

For individuals allergic to cat or dog dander who are themselves pet owners, no avoidance strategy can approach the benefit that will be gained with elimination of the pet from the home. 15 In view of emotional attachments that commonly occur with pet ownership, as well as the potential therapeutic value of pets that may exist, 16 the decision to advise removal of a pet from the home must be discussed openly with allergic patients and considered carefully from an individualized risk/benefit standpoint. If a cat or dog is removed from the home, it must be recognized that due to persistence of the allergen for periods of several months, clinical benefit may not occur promptly. When elimination of pets from the home is not possible, second best measures include restricting the pet from the allergic person's bedroom, use of high efficiency particulate or electrostatic air cleaners, and removal of carpets and other upholstered items which otherwise serve as a reservoir for allergen. 15 Although allergen reduction may be transient and the potential for clinical benefit has not been clearly established, bathing the pet (cat or dog) may also be attempted as a "second best" alternative to elimination of the pet from the home.

Two studies compared capsaicin with placebo . One study reported that capsaicin resulted in an improvement of overall nasal symptoms (a primary outcome ) measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) of 0 to 10. There was a mean difference ( MD ) of - (95% confidence interval ( CI ) - to -), MD - (95% CI - to -) and MD - (95% CI - to -) at two, 12 and 36 weeks post-treatment, respectively. Another study reported that, compared to placebo , capsaicin (at 4 µg/puff) was more likely to produce overall symptom resolution (reduction in nasal blockage, sneezing/itching/coughing and nasal secretion measured with a daily record chart ) at four weeks post-treatment (a primary outcome ). The risk ratio ( RR ) was (95% CI to ).

Allergic rhinitis may also be classified as Mild-Intermittent, Moderate-Severe intermittent, Mild-Persistent, and Moderate-Severe Persistent. Intermittent is when the symptoms occur <4 days per week or <4 consecutive weeks. Persistent is when symptoms occur >4 days/week and >4 consecutive weeks. The symptoms are considered mild with normal sleep, no impairment of daily activities, no impairment of work or school, and if symptoms are not troublesome. Severe symptoms result in sleep disturbance, impairment of daily activities, and impairment of school or work. [27]

Common adverse effects that occur with the use of intranasal decongestants are sneezing and nasal dryness. Duration of use for more than three to five days is usually not recommended, because patients may develop rhinitis medicamentosa or have rebound or recurring congestion. 3 However, a study of 35 patients found no rebound when oxymetazoline was used for 10 days. 30 Because oral decongestants may cause headache, elevated blood pressure, tremor, urinary retention, dizziness, tachycardia, and insomnia, patients with underlying cardiovascular conditions, glaucoma, or hyperthyroidism should only use these medications with close monitoring. 3 – 5 A study of 25 patients with controlled hypertension provides some reassurance about the use of oral decongestants; compared with placebo, this randomized crossover study found minimal effect on blood pressure with pseudoephedrine use. 31

No – stress does not cause allergies but it can make existing allergies worse. Stress is the body’s reaction to conflict or other situations that interfere with our normal balance of life.

Almost all our body’s systems make adjustments in a stressful situation including the digestive system, the cardiovascular system, the nervous system and the immune system. One of the things that happens is that out body releases numerous hormones and other chemicals – one of those is histamine. The release of histamine can result in allergy like symptoms and therefore it can make an existing allergy worse. 35

Allergic rhinitis steroid spray

allergic rhinitis steroid spray

Common adverse effects that occur with the use of intranasal decongestants are sneezing and nasal dryness. Duration of use for more than three to five days is usually not recommended, because patients may develop rhinitis medicamentosa or have rebound or recurring congestion. 3 However, a study of 35 patients found no rebound when oxymetazoline was used for 10 days. 30 Because oral decongestants may cause headache, elevated blood pressure, tremor, urinary retention, dizziness, tachycardia, and insomnia, patients with underlying cardiovascular conditions, glaucoma, or hyperthyroidism should only use these medications with close monitoring. 3 – 5 A study of 25 patients with controlled hypertension provides some reassurance about the use of oral decongestants; compared with placebo, this randomized crossover study found minimal effect on blood pressure with pseudoephedrine use. 31

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